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John Welsman

SOUND FORGE Beta User
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  1. yes, SF12 Pro has the same inaccessible dialogue in audio settings for channel mapping as SF 11 Pro. SF Audio Studio 12 has a diferent dialogue for selecting an audio device, as it is 2 channel not multi channel.
  2. Something that has always been missing, is the ability to manage the channel mapping in the audio settings in Preferences in the Options menu with the keyboard. I am aware that this is a 2-column table, but I am unable to manipulate the right-hand column, with the keyboard where I would be able to select as to the device I wish to use for that channel. May be a context menu, Shift-F10, could be added to each item to make that selection?
  3. sorted! for some reason running Forge120.exe only worked after several attempts even though I had allowed it through the Windows shield.
  4. Have run the batch file but I don't get an installation process. what am I doing wrong, as there is no setup.exe or equivalent?
  5. Steve, A good thought! However, I think one of the original tasks I was set with beta testing, was to find out where SF Audio Studio and no doubt SF Professional were not accessible for a screen reader user. It is clear, that some elements of SF will not at present be friendly for screen reader users. However, I do think that Magix are Kean for these products to be as accessible as possible without the need for third party scripts for Jaws for Windows and other access technology, so that is my premise for highlighting issues with the VST dialogue and other dialogues and elements if they don’t work as expected. Another thing that would be immensely helpful to blind Sound Forge users, is the ability to easily check if an In or Out point has been set. This is sometimes a point of confusion, so without being able to visibly see a highlighted area, mistakes can be made if you are not sure you have set either edit point. This could be confirmed with a tick next to the In or Out edit option in the insert menu if the edit point had been activated. The process of navigating around VST plugins is still not totally screen reader friendly. In a normal dialogue box, I can move between elements with the tab key and manipulate elements with text input, the space bar and arrow keys and the like However, with VST plugins in Sound Forge Audio Studio 12 it would not be possible for a screen reader user to do this in for example Ozone 7 without sighted help, as you did with me back in the summer. In Jaws for Windows, later versions, there is something called the touch cursor, which enables me to navigate around a screen, or dialogue, and interact with it, where traditional keyboard commands don’t seem to work. In Ozone 7 for example, I would open it, invoke the JAWS touch curser and then click on Pre-set File Explorer List. I could then switch back from touch curser to navigate the dialogue box in the normal way. Some elements like the pre-set list will work like this, but elements like buttons seem to trigger the track being processed to play, so there is clearly something not quite right with the use of keyboard commands using this method. Lastly, a JAWS user would have to remember to go to touch mode again to find the cancel or OK and the same thing happens. This in my opinion, is not an easy and productive way of navigating a dialogue box, so should not be the default way in which a screen reader user has to navigate elements of the software. I have also tried this with NVDA. Maybe it is me, but I wonder how other blind screen reader users cope with VST plugins in Sound Forge Audio Studio 12? PS. Have also tried using Ozone 7 in Sound Forge 11 Professional, and whilst the initial dialogue box is accessible, many of the VST defaults do not load, and I note other commands do not work without the use of the touch curser.
  6. Another thing that would be immensely helpful to blind Sound Forge users, is the ability to easily check if an In or Out point has been set. This is sometimes a point of confusion, so without being able to visibly see a highlighted area, mistakes can be made if you are not sure you have set either edit point. This could be confirmed with a tick next to the In or Out edit option in the insert menu if the edit point had been activated. The process of navigating around VST plugins is still not totally screen reader friendly. In a normal dialogue box, I can move between elements with the tab key and manipulate elements with text input, the space bar and arrow keys and the like However, with VST plugins in Sound Forge Audio Studio 12 it would not be possible for a screen reader user to do this in for example Ozone 7 without sighted help, as you did with me back in the summer. In Jaws for Windows, later versions, there is something called the touch cursor, which enables me to navigate around a screen, or dialogue, and interact with it, where traditional keyboard commands don’t seem to work. In Ozone 7 for example, I would open it, invoke the JAWS touch curser and then click on Pre-set File Explorer List. I could then switch back from touch curser to navigate the dialogue box in the normal way. Some elements like the pre-set list will work like this, but elements like buttons seem to trigger the track being processed to play, so there is clearly something not quite right with the use of keyboard commands using this method. Lastly, a JAWS user would have to remember to go to touch mode again to find the cancel or OK and the same thing happens. This in my opinion, is not an easy and productive way of navigating a dialogue box, so should not be the default way in which a screen reader user has to navigate elements of the software. I have also tried this with NVDA. Maybe it is me, but I wonder how other blind screen reader users cope with VST plugins in Sound Forge Audio Studio 12? PS. Have also tried using Ozone 7 in Sound Forge 11 Professional, and whilst the initial dialogue box is accessible, many of the VST defaults do not load, and I note other commands do not work without the use of the touch curser.
  7. I am a blind computer user and audio producer, so rely on audible feedback through a screen reader with accessible features of things like sound editors. I have been using Sound Forge since version 4.5, which was the first accessible version using keyboard commands. I have then been able to use iterative upgrades of Sound Forge Professional ever since, and find it the best editor for basic editing functions. I have used Sound Forge to produce freelance contributions to BBC Radio, producing content for commercial radio, a series of radio plays, audio manuals, dialogue for video production, podcasts and various personal projects with nature recordings. Whilst there is much I can do with Sound Forge, there are elements of a visual nature which are impossible to translate in to an accessible format, like spectrum analysis and visual wave form editing. This doesn’t stop me being very capable with manipulating sound, but it would be great if there was a way of getting to some of the functions that are currently inaccessible, as they rely on sight or mouse manipulation. What would I like in Sound Forge 12 Professional? Screen reader Access to VST plugins, split recording as can be found in Total Recorder, where input from Skype is on one channel and the microphone is recorded in the other channel. Keyboard accessible multi track editing, native DSF editing and rendering, access to Apple compressed formats, continued support for batch processing with network access.
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