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Mixdown


Guest Guest_Gene1995
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Guest Guest_Gene1995

Yesterday a friend and I recorded 7 simple tracks, all mono intentionally.

1. Guitar

2. Guitar 2

3. Bass

4. Vocal

5. Kick

6. Snare

7. Hihats

Using samplitude, we then bounced each track to a stereo wav file, creating 7 stereo wav files. Then set up a new project with 7 empty tracks and imported all 7 back in as stereo wav tracks.

We bounced the project both ways ...7 mono to 1 stereo and then the 7 stereo imports to 1 stereo.

Just playing around with this, we found ourselves having a pretty good debate going about which would work better and whether this is a redundent process.

I guess there is really no real question here, but I just thought I'd throw this out there to maybe get some other input on mixdown techniques.

Gene1995

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Samp processes in 32bit float. No matter what you hear,..Samp does like stereo files better. Processes faster and less cpu but,..harder on the hd (2x size waves)

Most folks that complain about the mono to stereo thing (when recording/bouncing) are either used to PT or other program or used to use analog gear and just dont grasp the idea well. (and dont like it much) OR some that have small hd's :lol: (bigger IS better) :lol: although,..if they look beyond it,..their end result will be a tad better sounding.

but,..that said,..I do record sometimes in 32/44.1 mono tracks. It just doesnt matter anymore really.

Hope thast helps!!! :o

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You two seem to be on the same page for the most part. My question would then be:

If Samp processes at 32 bit float no matter what...Then how could one have a better sound?

Would not the sound be the same? I say that because that did come up and was pretty much the whole argument.....(well maybe not argument) but discussion.

I agree it seem's to run smoother with stereo files.....Why is that? Even with double the HD work and file size?

He is a PT guy, and I agree, I think it's because that's what he does all of the time.

Gene1995

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I am no expert but I think it handles the files differently. I think if you have more available space for info,.. the resulting bounce can only benifit from it. Also could be the way Samp handles the wave data itself. Like recording from a 16bit A/D into samp vs recording from a 24bit device,...one will record more info, = better end result. So,.. in theory, recording a 24/44.1 mono wave vs a 24/44.1 stereo wave in samp ,... should give a better result. Not to say that this is the reason why Samp handles stereo waves better or that that is totally true,... I do believe this theory regardless, however,...recording 24bit vs 32bit may not make much difference.

When I record into samp, (A/D converters being SBLive or Mytek) I allways record as 32bit/44.1 or 88.2 waves. So long as the card supports it.

Might be cool to try it with a small project like yours. (just save the mixer settings from the 1st mono trks bounce and then use it in the stereo bounce) But I am pretty sure these difference are very small,...and not very noticable (32bit internal processing)...but ARE probably more noticable with large projects.

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record a guitar or bass (or any instrument)....1st in mono,...then to a stereo wave,... you "wont" hear a difference. You still hearing that same mono instrument only it has more info recorded. It is when recording/mixing many tracks,... that is where your final mix or bounce or end result will make a difference. And then probably only detectable with the highest quality D/A and monitors. Of course, the stereo tracks project will reach your hd trk count peak sooner than with the mono track recordings.

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I have to agree with "Boogie"......If "guest" is correct in his/her post...Is it safe to say, it would make no difference if one would record in mono or stereo? If what I hear is the same? But if the sound would change over several tracks.....Then I would argue it is not the same.

I think I understand where guest is going...but if you had more information being recorded, would that not be a different sound? Sorry "guest" I think I see where you are going..but I'm still on the fence.... :o

(By the way) Thanks for the replies....I had about had it with the crack software crap.....

Gene1995

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Guest GTBannah
Could it be that a stereo sample/recording sounds better/fuller than a mono recording/sample? :o

Try these ....

1) Set a singer up in front of a mic and record that, then set that same singer up in front of two mics, each two inches off center and record that.

2) Do the same thing with an acoustic guitar .... :lol:

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No, not like that....

recording a singer with mono mic to mono track is not same as recording same singer with 2 mics to stereo tracks.

I am speaking of recording singer with mono mic into Sampltude vip to a MONO track. (set as mono in "track" settings) vs recording same singer, same mic in Samplitude but set "track" properties to Stereo. This records the same exact signal, and still sounds mono (you cant tell difference) but puts it into a stereo wave file (2x larger) . It is these recordings that Samplitude will run smoother and the end result will sound better.

It is something to do with the mix engine and the way it was made.

The reason everyone doesnt do it is cuz of hd space/cpu usage and basic practicality.

the advantage is there, just very minimal.

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Hi Guest,

Could you please expand on the following:

It is something to do with the mix engine and the way it was made.

I am curious to learn why a mono track recorded in stereo (=same info on left and right channels) would sound better than the same track in mono.

Best,

Thomas

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NO.

But seriously,...does that really matter? Try it and see for yourself. If your results are minimal or...no-difference...then there's your answer.

It is "after" the fact that the results happen. (the end result; final mix; your pre-master)

Correct me if I am wrong here:

1- Samp does like stereo files better. Processes faster and less cpu but,..harder on the hd

2 - record a guitar or bass (or any instrument)....1st in mono,...then to a stereo wave,... you "wont" hear a difference. You still hearing that same mono instrument

3 - It is when recording/mixing many tracks,... that is where your final mix or bounce or end result will make a difference.

4 - I am pretty sure these difference are very small,...and not very noticable (32bit internal processing)...but ARE probably more noticable with large projects.

5 - the resulting bounce can only benifit from it.

If this makes sense,..then try it.

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