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Samp's Sequencer


Evensong
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Does any sequencer do this?

I am looking to buy Samplitude and given its rep it seems like the right choice for me. However, there is one sequencing feature I would love to have, if it exists in any sequencer. I have not been doing music for quite a while and when I was doing it regularly this feature was not available or even contemplated.

My sequences are mostly performance based. I play the main part on the piano and that becomes the conductor track. All the other parts I play or step-edit to that. When I have used sequencers in the past they allow you to quantize the played notes to the meter and tempo but not the other way around. I would like to be able to sync the meter to the notes that I have played. Piano perfromance is full of small and large tempo changes. When recording to a sequencer, of course, the moment you change the tempo slightly you are off for the rest of the piece.

One solution is to play the piece in tempo and then edit in the tempo changes. Of course, there are often so many of them and they are so subtle that doing it this way I could never capture the nuances of an actual performance.

Another solution is to not use the metering at all but to just record and use the time to know where you are. Just like recording to tape. I get the performance nuances but this loses all of the advantages of sequencing and especially the ability to print it out in notation software, so I can get a better player to play one of the other parts.

I can also record some parts with lose tempo and others with tighter tempo and mix them together but I think you get the idea.

What I would love is to be able to simply drag the beats to line up with the notes and let the software compute the tempo change required to make it all work.

Am I dreaming?

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Guest Gravitygrave
What I would love is to be able to simply drag the beats to line up with the notes and let the software compute the tempo change required to make it all work.

Cubase SX has this... it's called Time Warp. It's one of the featiures I use alot matching pre-sequenced stuff to live drums. I'd be interested to know if Samp has this or if it's on a future feature list.

Cheers, G

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Guest GTBannah

I think Sequoia has it. That was one of the first things that attracted me.

I think they call it the "Tempo Map" ....

I don't know if Samplitude has it.

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I found this in the help. I think this is the answer to the questions and the answer appears to be yes!!

Bar position markers (Advanced Tempo Mapping)

The tempo of a piece of music is usually defined already when it is composed. If the tempo is to increase at a certain bar position, simply define a tempo marker, with tempo interpolation referring to the previous marker if you like.

However, recorded audio material often does not correspond with the project tempo, e.g. a drummer’s reference track that is to indicate the tempo of further recordings or additionally composed material by means of many timing nuances. Instead of placing tempo makers or even having to adapt the reference material by means of time-stretching, you can create the musical grid at certain time positions in the linear course of playback of the project using support points, so-called bar position markers. This way you can synchronize the bar grid, musical grid and the corresponding MIDI data with available audio material.

Example: The drummer has recorded his track using the metronome, but has deliberately not hit important beginnings of a bar precisely. The musical grid is adapted to keep the groove within this performance. By placing a bar position marker, the Project Beat of "20", including the beginning of the chorus, is moved exactly to the first beat of the 20th bar played by the drummer.

This practical example shows that the bar position markers are used to combine the audio-based sample/time position (or SMPTE) with the musical bar position by means of defined support points. This allows for easy editing of projects with changing musical tempi when the musical grid is to be edited in the actual time course ("Bar 20 should begin a this point in time!").

The difference to a tempo marker is clear. The tempo marker defines a clear command: Faster (or slower) from here. A bar position marker, however, defines the tempo indirectly by adjusting the tempo before the marker in such a manner that the desired musical position ("Beat 20") is met precisely at the marker position.

The grid, the grid display, the metronome and the events in the MIDI Editor are automatically adjusted according to the changed musical tempo.

Note: Bar position markers immediately following a tempo marker always create a tempo run. Instead of a tempo jump, a bar position marker sets is used to set a tempo run if there is a bar position marker immediately before the tempo marker. As the tempo before the bar position marker has already been defined, the adjustment of the musical position has to be carried out by decreasing or increasing the tempo to such an extent that the required bar position meets the required time position at the bar position marker.

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Guest GTBannah
I found this in the help. I think this is the answer to the questions and the answer appears to be yes!!

Bar position markers (Advanced Tempo Mapping)

The tempo of a piece of music is usually defined already when it is composed. If the tempo is to increase at a certain bar position, simply define a tempo marker, with tempo interpolation referring to the previous marker if you like.

However, recorded audio material often does not correspond with the project tempo, e.g. a drummer’s reference track that is to indicate the tempo of further recordings or additionally composed material by means of many timing nuances. Instead of placing tempo makers or even having to adapt the reference material by means of time-stretching, you can create the musical grid at certain time positions in the linear course of playback of the project using support points, so-called bar position markers. This way you can synchronize the bar grid, musical grid and the corresponding MIDI data with available audio material.

Example: The drummer has recorded his track using the metronome, but has deliberately not hit important beginnings of a bar precisely. The musical grid is adapted to keep the groove within this performance. By placing a bar position marker, the Project Beat of "20", including the beginning of the chorus, is moved exactly to the first beat of the 20th bar played by the drummer.

This practical example shows that the bar position markers are used to combine the audio-based sample/time position (or SMPTE) with the musical bar position by means of defined support points. This allows for easy editing of projects with changing musical tempi when the musical grid is to be edited in the actual time course ("Bar 20 should begin a this point in time!").

The difference to a tempo marker is clear. The tempo marker defines a clear command: Faster (or slower) from here. A bar position marker, however, defines the tempo indirectly by adjusting the tempo before the marker in such a manner that the desired musical position ("Beat 20") is met precisely at the marker position.

The grid, the grid display, the metronome and the events in the MIDI Editor are automatically adjusted according to the changed musical tempo.

Note: Bar position markers immediately following a tempo marker always create a tempo run. Instead of a tempo jump, a bar position marker sets is used to set a tempo run if there is a bar position marker immediately before the tempo marker. As the tempo before the bar position marker has already been defined, the adjustment of the musical position has to be carried out by decreasing or increasing the tempo to such an extent that the required bar position meets the required time position at the bar position marker.

.... and this is in Samplitude?! Nice!! :huh:

Nice research, too .... :lol:

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